Devouring De Maupassant: Clochette

Title: Clochette
Date Read: 17th May 2010
Available Online?: YES (although read for this review was the David Coward translation of the story in A Day in the Country and Other Stories (Oxford University Press)).
Briefly: The narrator tells the sad tale of Clochette, an old woman whom he remembers clearly, calling on his home regularly during his childhood.
Afterthoughts: What begins as something of a mocking exercise (see quote below), ends as something entirely more sorrowful. And while I can’t find anything in this story which makes it stand out from anything else I’ve read from Maupassant, it’s certainly one worth reading.
Notable Quote: Well, every Thursday Mother Clochette came between half-past six and seven in the morning, and went immediately into the linen-room and began to work. She was a tall, thin, bearded or rather hairy woman, for she had a beard all over her face, a surprising, an unexpected beard, growing in improbable tufts, in curly bunches which looked as if they had been sown by a madman over that great face of a gendarme in petticoats. She had them on her nose, under her nose, round her nose, on her chin, on her cheeks; and her eyebrows, which were extraordinarily thick and long, and quite gray, bushy and bristling, looked exactly like a pair of mustaches stuck on there by mistake.

Rating: ★★★½☆

*Story read as part of my Devouring De Maupassant reading challenge.

About Rob

Rob, a self-confessed bibliophile, is without any hope of rehabilitation. He gets unnaturally excited over anything book-shaped, and if book sniffing were a crime then he would have been locked up years ago (which wouldn't bother him in the slightest provided his cell was lined with books)