Three Percent announce longlist for 2011 Best Translated Book Awards

Three Percent, the website dedicated to modern and contemporary international literature, have announced their longlist of 25 titles for this year’s Best Translated Book Awards.

Founded in 2007 with the purpose of bringing international fiction more into the focus of the American readership, this year’s longlist features authors from 19 countries writing in 12 languages.

Speaking at the announcement, award co-founder Chad W. Post said that the 25 titles selected for the longlist this year stood as a “testament to the number of high-quality works in translation that are making their way to American readers, thanks to a number of talented translators and exciting publishing houses.”

The final ten shortlisted titles for this year’s award will be announced on Thursday March 24th, with the overall winner being announced on April 29th in New York City, as part of the PEN World Voices Festival.

Meantime, Three Percent are planning on featuring each of the longlist titles on their website over the next few weeks, when each book’s particular qualities will be highlighted and discussed with the aid of translators, reviewers and editors.

The longlisted titles, presented in alphabetical order according to author, are as follows (clicking on a cover will take you to US publisher’s webpage for each book):


  • The Literary Conference by César Aira (New Directions). Translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver.
  • The Golden Age by Michal Ajvaz (Dalkey Archive). Translated from the Czech by Andrew Oakland.
  • The Rest Is Jungle & Other Stories by Mario Benedetti (Host Publications). Translated from the Spanish by Harry Morales.
  • A Life on Paper by Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud (Small Beer). Translated from the French by Edward Gauvin.
  • A Jew Must Die by Jacques Chessex (Bitter Lemon). Translated from the French by Donald Wilson.
  • A Splendid Conspiracy by Albert Cossery (New Directions). Translated from the French by Alyson Waters.
  • The Jokers by Albert Cossery (New York Review Books). Translated from the French by Anna Moschovakis.
  • Eline Vere by Louis Couperus (Archipelago). Translated from the Dutch by Ina Rilke.
  • Visitation by Jenny Erpenbeck (New Directions). Translated from the German by Susan Bernofsky.
  • The Blindness of the Heart by Julia Franck (Grove). Translated from the German by Anthea Bell.
  • Hocus Bogus by Romain Gary (Yale University Press). Translated from the French by David Bellos.
  • To the End of the Land by David Grossman (Knopf). Translated from the Hebrew by Jessica Cohen.
  • The True Deceiver by Tove Jansson (New York Review Books). Translated from the Swedish by Thomas Teal.
  • The Clash of Images by Abdelfattah Kilito (New Directions). Translated from the French by Robyn Creswell.
  • Bad Nature, or With Elvis in Mexico by Javier Marías (New Directions). Translated from the Spanish by Esther Allen.
  • Cyclops by Ranko Marinkovi? (Yale University Press). Translated from the Croatian by Vlada Stojiljkovi?.
  • Hygiene and the Assassin by Amélie Nothomb (Europa Editions). Translated from the French by Alison Anderson.
  • I Curse the River of Time by Per Petterson (Graywolf Press). Translated from the Norwegian by Charlotte Barslund.
  • A Thousand Peaceful Cities by Jerzy Pilch (Open Letter). Translated from the Polish by David Frick.
  • Touch by Adania Shibli (Clockroot). Translated from the Arabic by Paula Haydar.
  • The Black Minutes by Martín Solares (Grove/Black Cat). Translated from the Spanish by Aura Estrada and John Pluecker.
  • On Elegance While Sleeping by Emilio Lascano Tegui (Dalkey Archive). Translated from the Spanish by Idra Novey.
  • Agaat by Marlene Van Niekerk (Tin House). Translated from the Afrikaans by Michiel Heyns.
  • Microscripts by Robert Walser (New Directions). Translated from the German by Susan Bernofsky.
  • Georg Letham: Physician and Murderer by Ernst Weiss (Archipelago). Translated from the German by Joel Rotenberg.

About Rob

Rob, a self-confessed bibliophile, is without any hope of rehabilitation. He gets unnaturally excited over anything book-shaped, and if book sniffing were a crime then he would have been locked up years ago (which wouldn't bother him in the slightest provided his cell was lined with books)

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