Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award 2013 longlist

A History of the Present Illness by Louise Aronson (Bloomsbury) Fireproof and Other Stories by Celeste Auge (Doire Press) A Guide to Being Born by Ramona Ausubel (Riverhead Books) Hush Hush by Steven Barthelme (Melville House) Love Is Power Or Something Like That by A Igoni Barrett (Graywolf Press) The Peacock Cloak by Chris Beckett (NewCon Press) Safe as Houses by Marie-Helene Bertino (University of Iowa Press) The Iraqi Christ by Hassan Blasim (Comma Press) Psychology and Other Stories by C P Boyko (Biblioasis) The Manet Girl by Charles Boyle (Salt Publishing) Vanishing Point by Felix Cheong (Ethos Books) Four New Messages by Joshua Cohen (Graywolf Press) Tea at the Midland by David Constantine (Comma Press) Canary by Nancy Jo Cullen (Biblioasis) Where I Am Now by Robert Day (BkMk Press) Siege 13 by Tamas Dobozy (Milkweed Editions) Astray by Emma Donoghue (Picador) This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Diaz (Riverhead Books) The Aversive Clause by B C Edwards (Black Lawrence Press)_79 Garbage Night at the Opera by Valerie Fioravanti (BkMk Press) Miranda’s Shadow by Kitty Fitzgerald (Iron Press) What You Are Now Enjoying by Sarah Gerkensmeyer (Autumn House Press) LoveSexTravelMusik Stories for the EasyJet generation by Rodge Glass (Freight Books) The Miniature Wife and Other Stories by Manuel Gonzales (Riverhead Books) Kinsey and Me by Sue Grafton (G P Putnam’s Sons) News from Heaven by Jennifer Haigh (HarperCollins) Talking to Owls by Brindley Hallam Dennis (Pewter Rose Press) Hugging Thistles by Aideen Henry (Arlen House) Ride the Tortoise by Liesl Jobson (Jacana Media) This Close by Jessica Francis Kane (Graywolf Press) The Swarm by Andy Kissane (Puncher and Wattmann) Bobcat and Other Stories by Rebecca Lee (Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill) Black Vodka by Deborah Levy (& Other Stories) Watering Heaven by Peter Tieryas Liu (Signal 8 Press) The Beach at Galle Road by Joanna Luloff (Algonquin Books) Keeping the Peace by Colette Maitland (Biblioasis) The Stone Thrower by Adam Marek (Comma Press) Hair Side Flesh Side by Helen Marshall (ChiZine Publications) Forensic Songs by Mike McCormack (The Lilliput Press) Sleepwalkers and Other Stories by Bernie McGill (Whittrick Press) Blood Secrets by Nadine McInnis (Biblioasis) Psychotic Episodes by Alan McMonagle (Arlen House) An Unknown Sky and Other Stories by Susan Midalia (The University of Western Australia Publishing) The Rest Is Weight by Jennifer Mills (University of Queensland Press) The Pre-War House and Other Stories by Alison Moore (Salt Publishing) Black Dahlia & White Rose by Joyce Carol Oates (HarperCollins) The Colours of Man by Micheal O Conghaile (Clo Iar-Chonnacht) Happiness Like Water by Chinelo Okparanta (Granta Publications) The Gurkha’s Daughter by Prajwal Parajuly (Quercus Books) Boats on Land- A Collection of Short Stories by Janice Pariat (Random House India) Dot Dash by Jonathan Pinnock (Salt Publishing) Stoning the Devil by Garry Craig Powell (Skylight Press) Nothing Gold Can Stay by Ron Rash (HarperCollins) When It Happens to You by Molly Ringwald (HarperCollins) The Wild Flowers of Baltimore by Rob Roensch (Salt Publishing) Hitting Trees with Sticks by Jane Rogers (Comma Press) Tarcutta Wake by Josephine Rowe (University of Queensland Press) The Peripatetic Coffin and Other Stories by Ethan Rutherford (HarperCollins) Malay Sketches by Alfian Sa’at (Ethos Books) No Animals We Could Name by Ted Sanders (Graywolf Press) Tenth of December by George Saunders (Bloomsbury) The Fifth Lash & Other Stories by Anis Shivani (C&R Press) Fools by Joan Silber (W W Norton & Co) Tell Everyone I Said Hi by Chad Simpson (University of Iowa Press) We’re Flying by Peter Stamm (Granta Books) Spectacle by Susan Steinberg (Graywolf Press) The Syllabus of Errors by Ashley Stokes (Unthank Books) Little Raw Souls by Steven Schwartz (Autumn House Press) The Best Place on Earth by Ayelet Tsabari (HarperCollins Canada) We Live in Water by Jess Walter (HarperCollins) You Have 24 Hours to Love Us by Guy Ware (Comma Press) Battleborn by Claire Vaye Watkins (Granta) All the Bananas I’ve Never Eaten by Tony Williams (Salt Publishing) Spellbound–Stories of Women’s Magic Over Men by Joel Willans (Route) The Home Jar by Nancy Zafris (Northern Illinois University Press)

The longlist for the 2013 Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award was announced on Friday. In the running this year for the world’s richest prize for a short story collection, is a globe-spanning field of seventy five authors.

With thirty of the longlisted authors hailing from the US, the American writers dominate the longlist this year. Heading the pack is literary legend Joyce Carol Oates, who makes the longlist with her 25th collection of short stories. She’s joined by fellow American, George Saunders – a writer who is as equally renowned for his prowess in short fiction writing, the actor Molly Ringwald, who makes the longlist with a debut collection, and recent winner of The Story Prize, Claire Vaye Watkins. And fresh from his triumph in this year’s Sunday Times EFG Private Short Story Award, Dominican-American Junot Díaz also joins the longlist with the same collection that his winning story came from.

There is also, as always, a strong showing of UK and Irish authors on this year’s Frank O’Connor Award longlist. 2012 Man Booker shortlister Alison Moore is joined by poet and translator David Constantine and novelist and scriptwriter Jane Rogers, with Irish language writer Micheál Ó Conghaile heading the strong Irish contingent.

From wider reaching countries to have made this year’s longlist is Iraqi filmaker and writer Hassan Blasim, Israeli writer Ayelet Tsabari, Nigerian short story specialist A. Igoni Barrett, and from Switzerland, Peter Stamm.

The longlist in full, as elected by a panel of three – comprised of poet, publisher and short story writer, John F. Deane, deputy editor of The Sunday Times and founder of the Sunday Times Short Story Award, Cathy Galvin, and former executive editor of the Paris Review and founder of New York-based literary journal A Public Space, Brigid Hughes – is as follows (links lead to author websites where available, and publisher pages):

The longlist will be reduced to a shortlist of up to six books in late May, with the winner being announced in July. The winner will be presented with his/her cheque at the Cork International Short Story Festival in September.

For further details please visit the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award website, or the award’s Facebook page.

About Rob

Rob, a self-confessed bibliophile, is without any hope of rehabilitation. He gets unnaturally excited over anything book-shaped, and if book sniffing were a crime then he would have been locked up years ago (which wouldn't bother him in the slightest provided his cell was lined with books)

Comments

  1. I find these lists rather thrilling and would be chuffed if some unknown writer with a small press won. Alas, I don’t think this will happen. And you? I haven’t read Joyce Carole Oates since the eighties and would be interested to see how her work has changed. There are so many lesser known books I would love to delve into. Tips? Am looking forward to the shortlist in May.

    • Rob (Twitter: robaroundbooks)
      says:

      You know Chillcat, I don’t think an ‘unknown’ is going to win either, but we can live in hope. As for tips, well I’ve yet to read a good few of these myself but as far as lesser knowns go, I’d certainly recommend Claire Vaye Watkins BATTLEBORN and Tony Williams’ ALL THE BANANAS I’VE NEVER EATEN. Also take a look at Jon Pinnock’s DOT DASH and Rebecca Lee’s BOBCAT. And although I’ve not read it yet, I’ve heard a heck of a lot of good things about Hassan Blasim’s THE IRAQI CHRIST.

      Personally I’m kind of interested in Molly Ringwald’s debut collection, WHEN IT HAPPENS TO YOU. She’s a fine actor and I wonder if her writing is as skilful. Also deeply interested in Jess Walter’s WE LIVE IN WATER and Josephine Rowe’s TARCUTTA WAKE.
      Warmest
      Rob

  2. talkingpoint says:

    If reviews are any indication, Joyce Carole Oates, Junot Diaz, Prajwal Parajuly, Jessica Francis Kane, Joshua Cohen and Emma Donoghue

    • Rob (Twitter: robaroundbooks)
      says:

      It’s undoubtedly a very strong longlist, and one has to feel somewhat sorry for the ‘lesser knowns’. Still, it’s all good exposure for everyone.
      Warmest
      Rob
      P.S. I’m surprised you haven’t got George Saunders on your ‘shortlist’. Can’t seem to go anywhere these days without him and his collection popping up.

  3. stujallen (Twitter: stujallen)
    says:

    Joshua Cohen is one name that jumps out at me mainly as his book witz was about 800 pages long a stark contrast to a short story ,all the best stu

  4. No Karen Russell (Vampires in the Lemon Grove)?!?!? I don’t understand how that’s possible, especially in such a long list.

    • Rob (Twitter: robaroundbooks)
      says:

      Good point Karl. Didn’t even notice this. Emmm….only think I can think of is she couldn’t commit to attending the prize giving ceremony in Cork in September (one of the conditions facing the winner). That said, it’s a great promotional opportunity, whether her collection wins or not.
      Warmest
      Rob

    • Karen’s book wasn’t eligible because it was published in 2013. It’s certain to be in the running next year. It’s excellent. I hope someone notices my book, too, Stoning the Devil, which is also on the list!

      • Rob (Twitter: robaroundbooks)
        says:

        Of course, that explains it Garry. And congratulations on being on the Frank O’Connor this year (and the Edge Hill Short Story Prize). Can’t imagine too many not noticing that you’re on both. Good luck and thanks for stopping by to enlighten me (us).
        Warmest
        Rob

      • It’s odd that Jess Walter’s We Live in Water (which is in the long list here) is shown (on Amazon, anyway) as having the same publication date as Vampires in the Lemon Grove: Feb 12, 3013. But maybe there’s some vagary having to do with an official UK publication date or something.

  5. Thanks Rob!

  6. George Saunders and Prajwa Parajuly have been written about the most. Emma Donoghue deserves to be on this list. Cohen and Oates may just be snubbed. Thoughts Rob?

    • Rob (Twitter: robaroundbooks)
      says:

      Hi Carli,
      It’s an interesting list for sure, and one that’s totally dominated by the Americans. I can see Saunders or Diaz walking this, but Vaye Watkins may well snatch the prize from Diaz like she did with The Story Prize. Interesting you say that Parajuly has been written about widely. I’ve not seen anything.
      Warmest
      Rob

Trackbacks

  1. […] longlist for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award for 2013 has been announced. I could […]

  2. […] over the past few years. It’s a huge honour. Here’s a cool link to a short fiction blog, Rob Around Books, which compiled the longlisted covers into a neat […]