Into the world of Wodehouse…

What with elements of social media becoming more and more a den of despair of late, and my regular reading turning somewhat morbid (Alphonse Daudet’s In The Land of Pain and Katie Roiphe’s The Violet Hour to name but two – both extraordinary titles, but devastating), I felt the time was ripe to turn a little more attention towards the writings of P.G. Wodehouse.

His stories may be somewhat simplistic and repetitive in nature, but there’s no denying that Wodehouse’s jaunts and japes are exactly what the doctor ordered.

I’m finding him an absolute tonic, and along with him lifting the mist of melancholy that had descended, Wodehouse has given me the important reminder that too much high-brow and scholarly can be as detrimental to health and soul as….heaven forbid….no reading at all (incidentally, reading too many Russians a few years back brought about a similar effect).

And of course, diving piecemeal in to the world of Wodehouse has also given me the green light I needed to get on with the glorious endeavour (and amounting to somewhere around 100 titles it *is* an endeavour) of collecting those divine Everyman’s Library editions I spoke of a while back (on Facebook), so it’s joy all around.

Yes indeed, everything appears to be coming up roses once more, and I just wanted to reinject some positivity. And to say that if perhaps you find yourself feeling a little under the weather, then maybe all that is required is a steaming hot bowl of P.G. Wodehouse to put you back on your feet. He really does appear to be, the quintessential ‘chicken soup for the soul’.

Toodle-oo for now old chums, but expect increased commentary to come on Wodehouse. All hints, tips, guidance etc. most gratefully accepted.

About Rob

Rob, a self-confessed bibliophile, is without any hope of rehabilitation. He gets unnaturally excited over anything book-shaped, and if book sniffing were a crime then he would have been locked up years ago (which wouldn't bother him in the slightest provided his cell was lined with books).

Comments

  1. stu j allen (Twitter: stujallen)
    says:

    Often thought of doing this myself rob partly due to the lovely Everyman edition they had lovely stand at hatchards wheni was there in march look forward to your post Stu

    • Rob (Twitter: robaroundbooks)
      says:

      Delighted to have you drop by, dear Stu. En masse, I think there is no finer looking vista. And indeed, do it old chap! 🙂
      Rob

  2. Those Everyman editions are beautiful, aren’t they? It’s a long time since I read Wodehouse but I could do with a lift at the moment – and if I was going to re-read them, I would want those versions!

    • Rob (Twitter: robaroundbooks)
      says:

      They’re exquisite. I tackled ‘Carry On, Jeeves’ via the Jeeves and Wooster Omnibus published by Random House, and it’s something of an unwieldy fellow. The Everyman’s editions though are the perfect size, heft, quality etc. to make what is an enjoyable experience, even more so. And given that you need a lift, no sooner time to dig in. I look forward to comparing notes.
      Rob

  3. A vast improvement over the old Penguin editions that are now over 20 years old and falling apart. Many with teeny tiny fonts too.

    • Rob (Twitter: robaroundbooks)
      says:

      Absolutely. The Penguin editions would be a nice thing to have on the shelf though.

  4. I hate to admit it but I have never read Wodehouse. Yikes! He’s been on my get-to list forever but I just haven’t. This might be the perfect time, as you say.

    • Rob (Twitter: robaroundbooks)
      says:

      Time to get stuck in. Start with the short story collection, The Inimitable Jeeves or a more general collection such as Jeeves and the Yule-Tide Spirit and Other Stories (I mention this one because my daughter gifted it to me, and it offers a nice sweep).
      No excuses now 🙂
      Rob